TITLE

WHAT IF EQUALITY RULED?

AUTHOR(S)
Graydon, Shari
PUB. DATE
June 2008
SOURCE
Herizons;Summer2008, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that the Women's Court of Canada, a group of feminist legal scholars and litigators have rewritten half a dozen Supreme Court decisions in an effort to demonstrate the capacity of the Canadian Charter of Rights to support substantive equality. The women stimulate debate about the capacity of Canadian laws to deliver more equitable decisions. Several cases which include rulings on taxation, pensions, and social assistance among others are addressed by the first six decisions.
ACCESSION #
32613003

 

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