TITLE

EUROPE: New Wave

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Earth Island Journal;Winter2009, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports on renewable energy and a wave-powered electricity generating station in Portugal. The station opened in the fall of 2008 and is located three miles of off Portugal's northern coast. The machines, called "sea snakes," force high-pressured liquid through tubes that drive power generators, creating electricity that is transmitted to the shore. The article discusses megawatts produced by each "sea snake." Information is also provided on Portugal's use of wind turbines and hydroelectric dams.
ACCESSION #
35825518

 

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