TITLE

Weight-loss maintenance in successful weight losers: surgical vs non-surgical methods

AUTHOR(S)
Bond, D. S.; Phelan, S.; Leahey, T. M.; Hill, J. O.; Wing, R. R.
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
International Journal of Obesity;Jan2009, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p173
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective:As large weight losses are rarely achieved through any method except bariatric surgery, there have been no studies comparing individuals who initially lost large amounts of weight through bariatric surgery or non-surgical means. The National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) provides a resource for making such unique comparisons. This study compared the amount of weight regain, behaviors and psychological characteristics in NWCR participants who were equally successful in losing and maintaining large amounts of weight through either bariatric surgery or non-surgical methods.Design:Surgical participants (n=105) were matched with two non-surgical participants (n=210) on gender, entry weight, maximum weight loss and weight-maintenance duration, and compared prospectively over 1 year.Results:Participants in the surgical and non-surgical groups reported having lost approximately 56 kg and keeping 13.6 kg off for 5.5±7.1 years. Both groups gained small but significant amounts of weight from registry entry to 1 year (P=0.034), but did not significantly differ in magnitude of weight regain (1.8±7.5 and 1.7±7.0 kg for surgical and non-surgical groups, respectively; P=0.369). Surgical participants reported less physical activity, more fast food and fat consumption, less dietary restraint, and higher depression and stress at entry and 1 year. Higher levels of disinhibition at entry and increased disinhibition over 1 year were related to weight regain in both groups.Conclusions:Despite marked behavioral differences between the groups, significant differences in weight regain were not observed. The findings suggest that weight-loss maintenance comparable with that after bariatric surgery can be accomplished through non-surgical methods with more intensive behavioral efforts. Increased susceptibility to cues that trigger overeating may increase risk of weight regain regardless of initial weight-loss method.International Journal of Obesity (2009) 33, 173–180; doi:10.1038/ijo.2008.256; published online 2 December 2008
ACCESSION #
36035435

 

Related Articles

  • Short-Term Dynamics and Metabolic Impact of Abdominal Fat Depots After Bariatric Surgery. Weiss, Ram; Appelbaum, Liat; Schweiger, Chaya; Matot, Idit; Constantini, Naama; Idan, Alon; Shussman, Noam; Sosna, Jacob; Keidar, Andrei // Diabetes Care;Oct2009, Vol. 32 Issue 10, p1910 

    OBJECTIVE -- Bariatric surgery is gaining acceptance as an efficient treatment modality for obese patients. Mechanistic explanations regarding the effects of bariatric surgery on body composition and fat distribution are still limited. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -- Intra-abdominal and...

  • Live and let diet. Lerner, Ivan // ICIS Chemical Business;9/15/2008, Vol. 274 Issue 10, p46 

    The article presents the author's views on bariatric surgery, a method to treat obesity among teenagers, which is growing in popularity. The author says that though he is not against the surgery it should be done only as the last resort. He urges teenagers to exercise and reduce their caloric...

  • IPEG Guidelines for Surgical Treatment of Extremely Obese Adolescents.  // Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques;Dec2008, Vol. 18 Issue 6, pxiv 

    The article presents International Pharmaco-EEG Group (IPEG) guidelines for surgical treatment of extremely obese adolescents. These guidelines aim to direct surgeons who are thinking of using bariatric surgery for adolescents. The decision for conducting bariatric surgery must be based on a...

  • "The solution needs to be complex." Obese adults' attitudes about the effectiveness of individual and population based interventions for obesity. Thomas, Samantha L.; Lewis, Sophie; Hyde, Jim; Castle, David; Komesaroff, Paul // BMC Public Health;2010, Vol. 10 Issue 1, p420 

    Background: Previous studies of public perceptions of obesity interventions have been quantitative and based on general population surveys. This study aims to explore the opinions and attitudes of obese individuals towards population and individual interventions for obesity in Australia....

  • Bypass surgery for obesity.  // British Medical Journal;11/27/1976, Vol. 2 Issue 6047, p1278 

    Examines the efficacy of intestinal bypass surgery for the management of obesity. Procedure of the bypass; Rate of operative complication; Explanation for the change of eating habit; Evaluation of weight loss after surgery.

  • Interventions to improve long-term weight loss in patients following bariatric surgery: challenges and solutions. McGrice, Melanie; Don Paul, Kathlene // Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome & Obesity: Targets & Therapy;Jun2015, Vol. 8, p263 

    Bariatric surgery aims to provide long-term weight loss and improvement in weightrelated comorbidities. Unfortunately, some patients do not achieve predicted weight loss targets and many regain a portion of their lost weight within 2-10 years postsurgery. A review of the literature found that...

  • The Truth about Weight Loss and Obesity. Cima, James // American Chiropractor;Jun2009, Vol. 31 Issue 6, p24 

    The article addresses the questions that most patients ask about the principles of weight control. It examines why losing weight is usually not effective and what should be the target or goal to improve the physical appearance. It also presents the healthy percentages of body composition and...

  • Heavy Duty. Cottle, Michelle // New Republic;5/13/2002, Vol. 226 Issue 18, p16 

    Argues against the move of the U.S. government to correlate the war on obesity with that of the war on tobacco in 2002. Information on anti-obesity programs developed in several states; Statistics on obesity in the country; Flaws of the tobacco-fat analogy; Reasons for the complexity of the...

  • Gut Hormones as Peripheral Anti Obesity Targets. Small, Caroline J.; Bloom, Stephen R. // Current Drug Targets - CNS & Neurological Disorders;Oct2004, Vol. 3 Issue 5, p379 

    Many peptides are synthesised and released from the gastrointestinal tract. Whilst their roles in regulation of gastrointestinal function have been known for some time, it is now evident that they also influence eating behaviour and thus potential anti obesity targets. Peptide YY (PYY) is...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics