TITLE

Most Executives Foresee Recession Through 2011

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Money Management Executive;1/26/2009, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on an online survey of 1,445 U.S. finance executives conducted by Deloitte which found that 58.4% expect the recession could last until 2011. The survey also revealed that two-thirds are not in support of any additional bailouts beyond what has been done to prop up the finance and automotive industries. The survey respondents, according to Deloitte chief economist Carl Steidtmann, are too pessimistic, given the extraordinary actions the government has taken.
ACCESSION #
37335353

 

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