TITLE

Don't Get Stuck on the Web

PUB. DATE
October 2000
SOURCE
Export Today's Global Business;Oct2000, Vol. 16 Issue 10, pG&L20
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses Web site globalization. Three levels of approaching globalization technology.
ACCESSION #
3837619

 

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