TITLE

Risk and Protective Profiles Among Never Exposed, Single Form, and Multiple Form Violence Exposed Youth

AUTHOR(S)
Nurius, Paula S.; Russell, Patricia L.; Herting, Jerald R.; Hooven, Carole; Thompson, Elaine A.
PUB. DATE
April 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma;2009, Vol. 2 Issue 2, p106
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This investigation integrated violence exposure with critical risk and protective factors linked to healthy adolescent adaptation and transition into early adulthood. A racially diverse sample of 848 adolescents identified as at-risk for school drop-out were assessed for no, single, or multiple forms of violence exposure. MANOVA tests revealed that youth with single form victimization fared more poorly than never-exposed youth, and that multiple-form victimization held the greatest jeopardy to development. Youth with multiple-form victimization reported significantly elevated risk factors (emotional distress, life stress, suicide risk, risky behaviors) and lower protective factors (social support, school engagement, family structure) than both single-form and never-exposed youth. Implications are discussed for preventive and early intervention programming and for examining the transition of at-risk youth into young adulthood.
ACCESSION #
39768948

 

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