TITLE

No matter how you slice it, it's cannibalism

AUTHOR(S)
Bunner, Paul
PUB. DATE
April 2001
SOURCE
Report / Newsmagazine (Alberta Edition);04/16/2001, Vol. 28 Issue 8, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on the ethics of embryonic stem cell and fetal cell research. Recommendations of the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) regarding the research; Question of who should decide the fate of unused frozen embryos; Opinion that research may allow humans to become perfect, and therefore inhuman.
ACCESSION #
4332220

 

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