TITLE

U.S. Bailouts Could Cost $23.7 Trillion, Inspector General Says

PUB. DATE
August 2009
SOURCE
New American (08856540);8/17/2009, Vol. 25 Issue 17, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the perception of Special Inspector General of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) Neil Barofsky that TARP and other U.S. government bailout programs could cost 23.7 billion dollars in 2009. He also projected that its entire gross domestic product will only be 14.1 billion dollars. However, treasury officials stressed that Barofsky's figures are worst scenarios that will not succeed and it was never likely that all programs would be hit at the same time.
ACCESSION #
43590561

 

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