TITLE

Coal Remains a Major Player

PUB. DATE
August 2009
SOURCE
USA Today Magazine;Aug2009, Vol. 138 Issue 2771, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means for the U.S. to meet future energy needs while controlling emissions of greenhouse gases associated with climate change. The issue was examined by researchers at Indiana University at Bloomington. It is noted that CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from electrical power plants, transferring it to a storage site and injecting it into a safe location underground.
ACCESSION #
43741535

 

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