TITLE

The School Shootings: Why Context Counts

AUTHOR(S)
Hancock, LynNell
PUB. DATE
May 2001
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;May/Jun2001, Vol. 40 Issue 1, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Addresses the issue of school violence in the United States as of May 2001. Media coverage of school shootings; Percentage of people polled who believed that school killings could occur in their communities; Decrease in the number of children who brought weapons to school in 1997.
ACCESSION #
4440599

 

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