TITLE

Reliability, Validity and Classification Accuracy of the South Oaks Gambling Screen in a Brazilian Sample

AUTHOR(S)
Oliveira, Maria; Silveira, Dartiu; Carvalho, Simone; Collakis, Silvia; Bizeto, Juliana; Silva, Maria
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Gambling Studies;Dec2009, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p557
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability, validity and classification accuracy of the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS) in a sample of the Brazilian population. Participants in this study were drawn from three sources: 71 men and women from the general population interviewed at a metropolitan train station; 116 men and women encountered at a bingo venue; and 54 men and women undergoing treatment for gambling. The SOGS and a DSM-IV-based instrument were applied by trained researchers. The internal consistency of the SOGS was 0.75 according to the Cronbach’s alpha model, and construct validity was good. A significant difference among groups was demonstrated by ANOVA ( F(2.238) = 221.3, P < 0.001). The SOGS items and DSM-IV symptoms were highly correlated ( r = 0.854, P < 0.01). The SOGS also presented satisfactory psychometric properties: sensitivity (100), specificity (74.7), positive predictive rate (60.7), negative predictive rate (100) and misclassification rate (0.18). However, a cut-off score of eight improved classification accuracy and reduced the rate of false positives: sensitivity (95.4), specificity (89.8), positive predictive rate (78.5), negative predictive rate (98) and misclassification rate (0.09). Thus, the SOGS was found to be reliable and valid in the Brazilian population.
ACCESSION #
45363064

 

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