TITLE

Balance of power

AUTHOR(S)
Nathan, Stuart
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
Engineer (00137758);11/9/2009, Vol. 294 Issue 7783, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on 2050 as the key target year for Great Britain to lessen carbon emissions by 80%. According to David McKay, chief scientific advisor to the Department of Energy and Climate Change, the crucial statistic for every method is the number of energy it yields per unit area when searching at renewable electricity. He believes that the energy landscape in 2050 will have to take in as many efficiency improvements as it can, such as changing cars to electricity.
ACCESSION #
45730724

 

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