TITLE

Some Difficult Intuitions for the Principle of Universality

AUTHOR(S)
Kershnar, Stephen
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Utilitas;Dec2009, Vol. 21 Issue 4, p478
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The Principle of Universality asserts that a part retains its intrinsic value regardless of the whole in which it is a part or even whether it is part of a whole. The idea underlying this principle is that the intrinsic value of a thing supervenes on its intrinsic properties. Since the intrinsic properties remain unchanged so does the thing's intrinsic value. In this article, I argue that, properly understood, the Principle of Universality can handle seemingly troublesome intuitions about the relative intrinsic value of a vicious person having pain and his having pleasure. I specifically argue that the intuition that the former state is better is explained by the nature of the basic intrinsic-value states, which involve a person having a level of well-being and desert at a time. One implication of this is that given the nature of such basic intrinsic-value states, pleasure and pain are not value-bearing parts of virtuous and vicious attitudes.
ACCESSION #
47140437

 

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