TITLE

Counterpoint: All Prisoners Should Have the Same Rights & Captors Should Follow International Law

AUTHOR(S)
Levine, Greg
PUB. DATE
June 2018
SOURCE
Australia Points of View: Enemy Combatants;6/1/2018, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents an argument against the detention of enemy combatants by the U.S. It is the author's opinion that all prisoners of war should be held under terms consistent with international law. The detention of terrorists, the alleged violations of human rights at the U.S. prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and the threat to the political legitimacy of the U.S. in the international sphere are discussed.
ACCESSION #
47604517

 

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