TITLE

ON THINNING ICE

AUTHOR(S)
Barber, David
PUB. DATE
January 2010
SOURCE
Canadian Geographic;Jan/Feb2010, Vol. 130 Issue 1, p74
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a discussion on the effects of melting sea ice in the Arctic and on the tropical parts of the planet taken from "Two Ways of Knowing: Merging Science and Traditional Knowledge."
ACCESSION #
47798973

 

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