TITLE

Bye Bye Breastfeeding

AUTHOR(S)
Sloviter, Vikki
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
Pediatrics for Parents;Nov/Dec2009, Vol. 25 Issue 11/12, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the findings of the joint study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation on the lack of breastfeeding promotion in hospitals and birthing centers in the U.S. It outlines the psychological and nutritional benefits of breastfeeding which decrease both maternal and infant morbidity. The factors that contributed to the center's inadequate support of lactation practices are presented.
ACCESSION #
47908282

 

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