TITLE

FACTORS INFLUENCING HAART ADHERENCE AMONG PRIVATE HEALTH CARE SECTOR PATIENTS IN A SUBURB OF THE ETHEKWINI METRO

AUTHOR(S)
Naidoo, Panjasaram
PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine;2009, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) ushered in a new era in the management of the AIDS pandemic with new drugs, new strategies, new vigour from treating clinicians and enthusiasm on the part of their patients. What soon became evident, however, was the vital importance of patient adherence to prescribed medication in order to obtain full therapeutic benefits. Several factors can influence adherence to HIV drug regimens. Many treatment regimes are complex, requiring patients to take a number of drugs at set times during the day, some on a full stomach and others on an empty one. Other factors that could contribute to non-adherence include: forgetting to take medications, cost factor, side effects, incorrect use of drug, social reasons, denial or poor knowledge of drug regime. If the correct regimen is not prescribed and if patients do not adhere to therapy, then the possibility of resistant strains is high. Improving adherence is therefore arguably the single most important means of optimising overall therapeutic outcomes. Although several studies regarding patient adherence have been performed in the public health care sector, data on adherence in patients from the private health care sector of South Africa remain limited. Many factors influence compliance and identifying these factors may assist in the design of strategies to enhance adherence to such demanding regimens. This study aimed to identify these factors among private sector patients. Method: Descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among all consenting patients with HIV who visited the rooms of participating private sector doctors from May to July 2005. A questionnaire was administered to consenting participants. Participants who reported missing any medication on any day were considered non-adherent. The data obtained was analysed using SPSS 11.5. A probability value of 5% or less was regarded as being statistically significant. Categorical data was described using frequency tables and bar charts. Pearson's chi-square tests or Fischer's exact tests were used interchangeably as appropriate to assess associations between categorical variables. The study received ethics approval from the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine Ethics Committee. Results: A total of 55 patients completed the questionnaires and 10 patients refused to participate. There was no statistical difference between adherence to treatment and demographics such as age, gender and marital status.…
ACCESSION #
48277551

 

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