TITLE

ARCHAIC PERIOD FAUNAL USE IN THE WEST-CENTRAL FLORIDA INTERIOR

AUTHOR(S)
Austin, Robert J.; Carlson, Lisabeth; Estabrook, Richard W.
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Southeastern Archaeology;Winter2009, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p148
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Archaic period research in Florida has emphasized the importance of aquatic resources (both marine and freshwater) as a crucial factor in the development of greater cultural complexity, regionalization, and the establishment of permanent settlements. These interpretations are based on data primarily from coastal and lacustrine settings where aquatic invertebrates are especially abundant. Two recently investigated sites in west-central Florida-West Williams (8HI509) and Enclave C (8PA1269)-have produced well-preserved faunal samples from Late Archaic (5000-4000 B.P.) contexts at interior upland locales. Although associated with expansive freshwater marsh and swamp environments, these samples are distinguished from other reported Archaic period sites by the presence of a significant terrestrial component. These data have caused us to rethink current models of Archaic subsistence and settlement. Specifically, we argue that subsistence and settlement strategies were regionally diverse and temporally flexible in order to contend with variable local conditions. Within west-central Florida's interior, a broad-spectrum foraging strategy appears to have been practiced after about 5000 B.P.
ACCESSION #
48294902

 

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