TITLE

The Sound Logic Behind a Surprising Decision

AUTHOR(S)
Weyrich, Paul M.
PUB. DATE
August 2001
SOURCE
Human Events;8/27/2001, Vol. 57 Issue 32, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that United States President George W. Bush backs funding only of stem cell research that does not contradict pro-life principle. His reaction to the statement released by Bishop Fiorenza for the Catholic Bishops Conference in response to the decision of the president about the issue; Moral experts' reply to the decision.
ACCESSION #
5101349

 

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