TITLE

Awaken the Pashtuns

AUTHOR(S)
Ajami, Fouad
PUB. DATE
August 2010
SOURCE
New Republic;8/12/2010, Vol. 241 Issue 13, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article compares the Afghanistan war with the Iraq war and discusses the attitude of the U.S. government towards both wars. The article notes that many in the government feel that the Iraq war was the wrong war and the Afghanistan war is the right one. U.S. President Barack Obama, though not enthusiastic about the Afghan war, heavily criticized the U.S. involvement in Iraq. The article also notes that the Iraq war creates pressure on the Afghan war to have the same results as when the alliance between the Iraq Sunnis and the jihadists was broken. The U.S. government is hoping that the Afghans will break with the Taliban.
ACCESSION #
52433455

 

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