TITLE

Burnout: Its Impact on Child Warfare Workers and Their Spouses

AUTHOR(S)
Jayaratne, Srinika; Chess, Wayne A.; Kunkel, Dale A.
PUB. DATE
January 1986
SOURCE
Social Work;Jan/Feb86, Vol. 31 Issue 1, p53
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a study on the impact of work stress on family relations. Workers who scored high on the burnout scales used in the study are more likely to report feelings of anxiety, depression, irritability and somatic complaints and would also be more likely to report less satisfaction with their jobs and lower self-esteem compared to workers who scored low on the burnout scales. The study also deals with the extent to which workers discussed their concerns about work with their spouses. It is observed that a worker who is buried out makes a sharp distinction between his or her personal and professional selves by not discussing work at home. To the extent that this observation is correct, workers who are feeling high levels of strain would be less likely to talk about their work with their spouses and further might try to hide stress symptoms from them. The unmeasured damage that cealing burnout would add to the worker's personal well-being and job performance could be significant.
ACCESSION #
5293636

 

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