TITLE

Twenty years after chernobyl in Hungary: the Hungarian perspective of energy policy and the role of nuclear power

AUTHOR(S)
Ámon, Ada
PUB. DATE
May 2006
SOURCE
Energy & Environment;2006, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p383
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article guides the reader through the past 20 years of Hungarian energy policy development, which is still controlled by the old nomenclature. The officials and the academic circles were and are trying to undermine and make a bagatelle out of the Chernobyl disaster. While, in April 2003 at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant the worst accident after Chernobyl in Europe happened. Even though 3.6 tonnes of fission material has been laying at the bottom of a container close to the reactor for three years, the Parliament gave a green light to life-time extension of the Hungarian nuclear plant.
ACCESSION #
54013813

 

Related Articles

  • Chernobyl Disaster. McGill, Sara Ann // Chernobyl Disaster;8/1/2017, p1 

    Presents an overview of the 1986 nuclear disaster in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Causes of the accident, including the power plant's disabled safety system; Radioactive contamination released before the reactor was contained; Deaths and hospitalizations caused by the explosion and ensuing pollution;...

  • Beyond Chernobyl. Matijevich, Aleksandr // Transitions Online;4/14/2008, p3 

    The article reveals that Belarus is once again embracing nuclear energy, following the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986. The move is part of the country's goal to cut its dependence on Russian gas after a couple of winters of price hikes and shut-offs. Belarusian President Alyaksandr...

  • LEARNING FROM CHERNOBYL. Ramberg, Bennett // Foreign Affairs;Winter86/87, Vol. 65 Issue 2, p304 

    Discusses the lessons that can be learned by the international community from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine in April 1986. Indication that planning conducted at the national level alone cannot eliminate the risks posed to all nations by nuclear energy; Greater...

  • Chernobyl, a new Exhibition. Paull, John // Chain Reaction;Winter2006, Issue 96, p45 

    Focuses on a new Chernobyl Exhibition which has been created in Denmark for the 20th anniversary and will be exhibited in major Australian cities. Damages wrought by the exploding Chernobyl nuclear reactor; Estimates of the amount of radioactive fuel.

  • Revelations of a Chernobyl insider. Marples, David R. // Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists;Dec1990, Vol. 46 Issue 10, p16 

    This article presents an interview with Yuri Risovanny, head of the foreign relations bureau in the international department of the Pripyat Industrial and Research Association, located at Chernobyl, Ukraine. Salaries of soldiers who worked the Chernobyl clean-up; Answers to rumors over...

  • LETTER FROM WASHINGTON. McCracken, Samuel // National Review;6/6/1986, Vol. 38 Issue 10, p15 

    Points that the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Ukraine is certainly a great disaster and certainly great lessons will be drawn from it. Efforts by anti-nuclear activists around the world to use this as evidence that it can happen in the U.S.; Demand for a phase-out of all U.S. nuclear power...

  • Chernobyl Five Years Later. Reiffel, Leonard // National Review;5/13/1991, Vol. 43 Issue 8, p24 

    Examines the nature of the effects of the Chernobyl disaster five years after the nuclear plant was destroyed. Author's visit to the nuclear plant and homes around Chernobyl; Official Soviet reaction to the disaster; Efforts to limit the consequences of the explosion; Continuing environmental...

  • `We shall be killed in silent ways.' Chernousenko, Vladimir // Earth Island Journal;Winter95, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p33 

    Presents an excerpt of a talk by the author on the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident on April 25, 1986. Findings of his investigations; After effects of the tragedy; Why nuclear stations are dangerous.

  • Science and Citizenship under Postsocialism. Petryna, Adriana // Social Research;Summer2003, Vol. 70 Issue 2, p551 

    The article explores science as a political strategy and the place of scientific knowledge in the dynamics of a postsocialist transition by taking the management of the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe in Ukraine as a case in point. The author explores ways of conceiving science as...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics