TITLE

Early drug therapy reduces HIV transmission, study says

AUTHOR(S)
Taylor, Billy
PUB. DATE
May 2011
SOURCE
Pink Paper;5/13/2011, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the HIV Prevention Trials Network's controlled trial conducted across Africa, Asia and the Americas, known as HPTN 052, which shows that treating an HIV-positive person with anti-retroviral therapy can reduce the risk of sexual transmission of HIV to an uninfected partner.
ACCESSION #
61030114

 

Related Articles

  • Patients Lost to Care Are More Likely to be Viremic Than Patients Still in Care. Stinson, Kathryn; Ford, Nathan; Cox, Vivian; Boulle, Andrew // Clinical Infectious Diseases;May2014, Vol. 58 Issue 9, p1344 

    A letter to the editor is presented which discusses virological failure among patients on first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia.

  • Corrigendum.  // Journal of the International AIDS Society;2013, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p1 

    A correction to the article "Individual and contextual factors influencing patient attrition from antiretroviral therapy care in an urban community of Lusaka, Zambia" is presented.

  • Diplopia in a Patient with HIV Infection. Dhillon, Wishwdeep S.; Shah, Tushar // New England Journal of Medicine;4/15/2010, Vol. 362 Issue 15, pe52 

    The article presents a case study of a man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who was receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and found to have diplopia and headache for a week.

  • Point-of-Care Urine Antigen Screening Tests for Tuberculosis and Cryptococcosis: Potential for Mortality Reduction in Antiretroviral Treatment Programs in Africa. Lawn, Stephen D.; Wood, Robin // Clinical Infectious Diseases;3/1/2012, Vol. 54 Issue 5, p739 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Early mortality among adults accessing antiretroviral treatment programmes in sub-Saharan Africa" by S. D. Lawn, A. D. Harries, X. Anglaret, L. Myer and R. Wood in a previous issue.

  • Preventing Antiretroviral Treatment Interruptions among HIV/AIDS Patients in Africa. Mills, Edward J.; Nabiryo, Christine // PLoS Medicine;Jan2013, Vol. 10 Issue 1, p1 

    An introduction is presented in which the editors discuss the article on the issue concerning the study which explores the antiretroviral treatment of patients with HIV and AIDS in Africa.

  • Efficacy of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine versus Abacavir-Lamivudine. Landman, G. W. D.; Soonawala, D.; Amin, Janaki; Martin, Allison; Bloch, Mark; Carr, Andrew // Clinical Infectious Diseases;4/15/2010, Vol. 50 Issue 8, p1200 

    A letter to the editor and a reply are presented in response to the article about the simplification of antiretroviral therapy in the previous issue.

  • Progress of implementation of the World Health Organization strategy for HIV drug resistance control in Latin America and the Caribbean. Ravasi, Giovanni; Jack, Noreen; Alonso Gonzalez, Mónica; Sued, Omar; Pérez-Rosales, María Dolores; Gomez, Bertha; Vila, Marcelo; Del Riego, Amalia; Ghidinelli, Massimo // Pan American Journal of Public Health;Dec2011, Vol. 30 Issue 6, p657 

    By the end of 2010, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) achieved 63% antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage. Measures to control HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at the country level are recommended to maximize the efficacy and sustainability of ART programs. Since 2006, the Pan American Health...

  • Treatment of HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings: Exploring the idea of universal test and treat. van der Horst, Charles; Herce, Michael // Infectious Disease News;Aug2013, Vol. 26 Issue 8, p14 

    The author presents his views on the guidelines released by the World Health Organization on the use of antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and argues that it is time to use the test-and-treat approach to treat HIV.

  • Early ART led to smaller HIV reservoir.  // Infectious Disease News;Aug2013, Vol. 26 Issue 8, p15 

    The article discusses antiretroviral therapy (ART) that references a study by V.J. Jain that ART, when administered in the first few months following human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can limit the size of HIV reservoir are inconclusive.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics