TITLE

Core Temperature Changes in Service Members With and Without Amputations During the Army 10-Miler

AUTHOR(S)
Andrews, Anne M.; Wunderlich, Benjaman; Linberg, Alison
PUB. DATE
June 2011
SOURCE
Military Medicine;Jun2011, Vol. 176 Issue 6, p664
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this case study was to assess differences in core temperature between individuals with and without amputations during a 10-mile run. Decreased body surface area and increased energy needs for ambulation may increase heat production and risk of heat injury for individuals with amputations. Two runners, 1 with and 1 without amputation, completed a 10-mile road race. Anthropometrics, body composition, and energy expenditure were collected before the run. Core temperature and activity were measured continually during the event. Maximum core temperature for the runner with amputation was 38.4°C and for the runner without amputation was 37.9°C. Despite the higher temperature, the runner with amputation completed the run at a slower pace than the one without amputation, indicating that higher core body temperatures may be achieved in individuals with amputation at similar workloads. These data suggest that future research is needed to elucidate differences in core temperature in individuals with amputations.
ACCESSION #
61467641

 

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