TITLE

Embryo cell research should continue, committee says

AUTHOR(S)
Dyer, Owen
PUB. DATE
March 2002
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);3/2/2002, Vol. 324 Issue 7336, p503
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that the House of Lords Select Committee on Stem Cell Research suggested that researchers should continue to have access to human embryos in Great Britain. Suggestion that the government conduct a further review towards the end of the decade to consider whether stem cell research is still necessary; Recommendation that research on adult stem cells should be strongly encouraged by the government.
ACCESSION #
6302783

 

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