TITLE

That's why we should all go to Iceland

AUTHOR(S)
Tran, T. C.; Sigurbjornsson, Omar
PUB. DATE
June 2011
SOURCE
TCE: The Chemical Engineer;Jun2011, Issue 840, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses how to convert stranded or intermittent renewable energy from geothermal, wind or solar sources, as well as captured carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial emissions into renewable fuel. It also cites the first-generation biofuels made from corn, beet, and sugar, among others, including ethanol and biodiesel that are being utilized in Brazil, Europe and the U.S. It presents the estimate by the International Energy Agency (IEA) that biofuels can supply as much as 27% of global transportation fuel by 2050.
ACCESSION #
63493165

 

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