TITLE

PREDICTING BEHAVIOR WITH INTENTIONS: A COMPARISON OF CONDITIONAL VERSUS DIRECT MEASURES

AUTHOR(S)
Miniard, Paul W.; Obermiller, Carl; Page Jr., Thomas J.
PUB. DATE
January 1982
SOURCE
Advances in Consumer Research;1982, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p461
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This research attempts to extend upon an earlier study (Warshaw, 1980) concerning the predictive validity of alternative behavioral intentions measures. Contrary to Warshaw's findings, our results indicate little difference between conditional and direct measures. In addition, contextual correspondence between intention and behavior had little effect on their relationship.
ACCESSION #
6430765

 

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