TITLE

The Methods of Reconstruction of Pancreatic Digestive Continuity After Pancreaticoduodenectomy: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

AUTHOR(S)
Sun Hu Yang; Ke Feng Dou; Sharma, Neel; Wen Jie Song
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
World Journal of Surgery;Oct2011, Vol. 35 Issue 10, p2290
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Pancreatic fistula (PF) is an important factor responsible for the considerable morbidity associated with pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). There have been many techniques proposed for the reconstruction of pancreatic digestive continuity to prevent fistula formation but which is best is still highly debated. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of methods of anastomosis after PD. Methods: A full literature search was conducted in the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register Databases, Medline, and other resources irrespective of language. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were considered for inclusion. Analyses were carried out using RevMan software. Results: In all, ten RCTs that included a total of 1,408 patients were included. The meta-analysis showed that the PF, postoperative complications, biliary fistula, mortality, reoperation, and length of hospital stay were not statistically different between the pancreaticogastrostomy (PG) and pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) groups. The PF, postoperative complications, mortality, and reoperation were not statistically different between the duct-to-mucosa PJ and PJ groups. Binding PJ significantly decreased the PF and postoperative complications compared with conventional PJ. The PF, postoperative complications, and mortality were not statistically different between ligation of the pancreatic duct without anastomosis versus PJ. Conclusion: No pancreatic reconstruction technique after PD was found to be applicable to all kinds of pancreatic remnants in our systematic review and meta-analysis. Some new approaches such as binding PJ and modified PG will be considered for study in the future.
ACCESSION #
65300102

 

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