TITLE

The Necessary Good that is Nuclear Power

AUTHOR(S)
Davis, Dorothy
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
POWERGRID International;Oct2011, Vol. 16 Issue 10, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article explores the benefits of nuclear power. The nuclear power plants require less fuel than generating power through the use of fossil fuels. It also provides utility scale electric generation in a clean, reliable and economic manner. Its economic benefits include providing low-cost high volumes of electricity, clean energy jobs and a boost to suppliers of commodities. The article mentions some major accidents related to nuclear power including the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan.
ACCESSION #
66711446

 

Related Articles

  • Nuclear power to remain vital in post-Fukushima era.  // MarketWatch: Energy;Nov2011, Vol. 11 Issue 11, p12 

    The article focuses on the importance of nuclear power in post-Fukushima period. It mentions that the role of nuclear power was not at risk as found in the report entitled "Nuclear Power Generation: Situation and Outlook Across Key Markets." It states that the nuclear power generators will be...

  • Power of the Atom. Davis, Lucas; Hausman, Catherine // Finance & Development;Dec2015, Vol. 52 Issue 4, p18 

    The article examines the headwinds faced by nuclear power as of December 2015. Nuclear power's history is discussed as well as its role in global electricity supply and the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan. Other topics include the boom and bust in the nuclear power sector, increase...

  • AFTER FUKUSHIMA. NAFF, CLAY FARRIS // Humanist;May/Jun2011, Vol. 71 Issue 3, p17 

    The article discusses the state of nuclear energy in the aftermath of the March 2011 disaster at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. Possible consequences of the event include long-lasting radioactive contamination, increased cancer rates, and damage to wildlife. A global public opinion...

  • Atomausstieg: The withdrawal of Germany from nuclear energy and its impact on energy security and the diversification of energy supply. Schejbalová, Barbora; Černoch, Filip // International Issues & Slovak Foreign Policy Affairs;2013, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p74 

    In immediate response to the disaster at Fukushima Daichii, Germany decided to cut off all of its nuclear resources by 2020, and in that manner fully withdraw from using nuclear energy. This study analyzes this decision in the context of the shift in Germany's dependence to imports of raw...

  • The nuclear conundrum for developing countries: are they ready yet? Siddiky, Ishrak Ahmed // Journal of Energy & Natural Resources Law;May2015, Vol. 33 Issue 2, p171 

    In 2012 Bangladesh, against strong public opinion, decided to build the country's first nuclear power plant in the western region of Rooppur. The government argued that the project is necessary to diversify the country's energy mix in order to improve its electricity generation capacity. This...

  • After The Media Has Gone: Fukushima, Suicide and the Legacy of 3.11. SEGAWA, Makiko // Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus;5/7/2012, Issue 19, p3 

    The author explores the realities of living in the Fukushima Prefecture a year after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake, the tsunami that followed, and the resulting Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant disaster. She reports that the municipal government of Minami-soma city, Fukushima Prefecture...

  • DESPUÉS DE FUKUSHIMA.  // DYNA - Ingeniería e Industria;jun2011, Vol. 86 Issue 3, p247 

    No abstract available.

  • Vogtle Latest Nuclear Plant To Install Emergency FLEX Dome. Judy, Scott // ENR: Engineering News-Record;6/29/2015, Vol. 274 Issue 19, p18 

    Southern Company and Georgia Power unveiled installation of disaster-resistant storage dome

  • Core safety of Indian nuclear power plants (NPPs) under extreme conditions. JOSHI, J B; NAYAK, A K; SINGHAL, M; MUKHOPADHAYA, D // Sadhana;Oct2013, Vol. 38 Issue 5, p945 

    Nuclear power is currently the fourth largest source of electricity production in India after thermal, hydro and renewable sources of electricity. Currently, India has 20 nuclear reactors in operation and seven other reactors are under construction. Most of these reactors are indigenously...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics