TITLE

Graham: We Had Same Info as Bush

AUTHOR(S)
Freddoso, David
PUB. DATE
May 2002
SOURCE
Human Events;5/27/2002, Vol. 58 Issue 20, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reveals that the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee had received the same terrorism intelligence prior to September 11, 2001 as the Bush administration according to chairman Bob Graham (D-Fla.). Information on the threats received by the administration against U.S. targets before September 11; Accusation of Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) against President George W. Bush.
ACCESSION #
6728940

 

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