TITLE

Trocar-Site Hernia After Single-Port Cholecystectomy: Not an Exceptional Complication?

AUTHOR(S)
Krajinovic, Katica; Ickrath, Pascal; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Reibetanz, Joachim
PUB. DATE
December 2011
SOURCE
Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques;Dec2011, Vol. 21 Issue 10, p919
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: When compared with standard multiport laparoscopy, the larger fascial incision in single-port surgery (SPS) may imply a potentially increased risk of surgical-site complications, such as herniation. The long-term risk of access-site complications in SPS is still unpredictable. Methods: Between July 2009 and May 2011, n=78 patients ( n=54 females), with a median age of 42 years (range: 18-85 years), underwent single-port cholecystectomy. The median body mass index was 25.4 kg/m2 (range: 17-39 kg/m2). All surgeries were performed by a single surgeon (K.K.) using a completely reusable single-port access device (X-Coneâ„¢; KARL STORZ GmbH, Tuttlingen, Germany), and fascial closure technique was comparable in all patients. The first 50 patients ( n=32 females) attended a structured follow-up examination including a meticulous clinical examination and ultrasonography of the access site at a median follow-up time of 17 months (range: 9-23 months). Results: We recorded postoperative complications in 5 of the 50 patients (10%) after single-port cholecystectomy. Four occurred in the early postoperative course and presented as mild wound complications. One of the 50 patients (2%) experienced a symptomatic trocar-site hernia (TSH) 4 months after surgery. No biliary complications (bile leakage, retained stones, etc.) were recorded. Conclusions: Although potentially biased by a relatively small number of patients, our study provides evidence that TSH after single-port cholecystectomy is (i) not less frequent when compared with standard laparoscopy, (ii) not as infrequent as suggested by the current literature, and (iii) not only associated with technical failure or patients' comorbidity.
ACCESSION #
67532907

 

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