TITLE

We Have Little to Gain from Trade Disputes, by Very Much to Lose

AUTHOR(S)
Ischinger, Wolfgang
PUB. DATE
May 2002
SOURCE
Intereconomics;May/Jun2002, Vol. 37 Issue 3, p135
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines the effect of the September 11 terrorist attacks on translantic trade transformations. Support of Germany on anti-terrorism initiative of the U.S.; Strategic dimension of translantic trade; Details the steel dispute between the U.S. and the European Union countries.
ACCESSION #
7334760

 

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