TITLE

Social Support for Healthy Behaviors: Scale Psychometrics and Prediction of Weight Loss Among Women in a Behavioral Program

AUTHOR(S)
Kiernan, Michaela; Moore, Susan D.; Schoffman, Danielle E.; Lee, Katherine; King, Abby C.; Taylor, C. Barr; Kiernan, Nancy E.; Perri, Michael G.
PUB. DATE
April 2012
SOURCE
Obesity (19307381);Apr2012, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p756
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Social support could be a powerful weight-loss treatment moderator or mediator but is rarely assessed. We assessed the psychometric properties, initial levels, and predictive validity of a measure of perceived social support and sabotage from friends and family for healthy eating and physical activity (eight subscales). Overweight/obese women randomized to one of two 6-month, group-based behavioral weight-loss programs (N = 267; mean BMI 32.1 ± 3.5; 66.3% White) completed subscales at baseline, and weight loss was assessed at 6 months. Internal consistency, discriminant validity, and content validity were excellent for support subscales and adequate for sabotage subscales; qualitative responses revealed novel deliberate instances not reflected in current sabotage items. Most women (>75%) 'never' or 'rarely' experienced support from friends or family. Using nonparametric classification methods, we identified two subscales-support from friends for healthy eating and support from family for physical activity-that predicted three clinically meaningful subgroups who ranged in likelihood of losing ≥5% of initial weight at 6 months. Women who 'never' experienced family support were least likely to lose weight (45.7% lost weight) whereas women who experienced both frequent friend and family support were more likely to lose weight (71.6% lost weight). Paradoxically, women who 'never' experienced friend support were most likely to lose weight (80.0% lost weight), perhaps because the group-based programs provided support lacking from friendships. Psychometrics for support subscales were excellent; initial support was rare; and the differential roles of friend vs. family support could inform future targeted weight-loss interventions to subgroups at risk.
ACCESSION #
73889322

 

Related Articles

  • The Surgical Solution? Cockrel, Lisa Ann // Today's Christian Woman;May2005, Vol. 27 Issue 3, p38 

    Looks into the implications of weight loss surgery (WLS) for believers. Risk of complications associated with WLS; Ability of the WLS procedure to make behavioral change; Relation of the issues involved in the decision to have WLS to health. INSETS: A WEIGHT-LOSS SURGERY PRIMER;SECRETS OF SUCCESS.

  • The variability in adherence to dietary treatment and quality of weight loss: overweight and obesity. García-Galbis, Manuel Reig; Cortés Castell, Ernesto; Rizo Baeza, Mercedes; Gutiérrez Hervás, Ana // Nutricion Hospitalaria;may2015, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p2017 

    Objective: Observation of weight loss and the maximum time that individualized dietary treatment qualitative and quantitative is shown to be effective. Method: 4625 consultations were conducted with 616 patients over 25 years old, in the nutrition consultation, using the qualitative and...

  • Provide quality health care, not weight cycling. Smith, Sally // Healthy Weight Journal;Sep/Oct97, Vol. 11 Issue 5, p94 

    Discusses United States obesity researchers, nutritionists, dietitians and physicians' emphasis on weight loss for obese persons. Attempts to find behavioral, dietary, pharmaceutical and surgical treatments for obesity; Effect of weight cycling on obesity; Paradigm shift for physicians; Book...

  • Fat is a mental health issue. Gray, Janet // Healthcare Counselling & Psychotherapy Journal;Oct2008, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p18 

    The article focuses on the weight management programme in Wales. With the goal to change the health behavior of obese people in Wales, the Feel better weight management groups programme was established. In the programme, a combination of diet and exercise was presented to the group members to...

  • Yes, But Is Weight Loss the Be-All and the End-All?  // Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter;Jul2004, Vol. 22 Issue 5, p1 

    Interviews Heather Bell, a nutrition therapist at the Tufts-New England Medical Center about weight management. Questions asked by Bell to her patients who wanted to lose weight; View on healthcare providers regarding their service on overweight patients; Approach on pursuing people to consider...

  • RELATIONS OF CHANGES IN PHYSICAL SELF-APRAISAL AND PERCEIVED ENERGY WITH WEIGHT CHANGE IN OBESE WOMEN BEGINNING A SUPPORTED EXERCISE AND NUTRITION INFORMATION PROGRAM. ANNESI, JAMES J. // Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal;2007, Vol. 35 Issue 10, p1295 

    In preliminary investigation, relations of changes in the self-appraisal factors of body satisfaction and physical self-concept, and changes in the mood factors of fatigue and energy, were tested with weight changes over 20 weeks in obese women (N = 52) initiating a supported exercise and...

  • First Australian Experiences With an Oral Volume Restriction Device to Change Eating Behaviors and Assist With Weight Loss. McGee, Toni L.; Grima, Mariee T.; Hewson, Ian D.; Jones, Kay M.; Duke, Ellen B.; Dixon, John B. // Obesity (19307381);Jan2012, Vol. 20 Issue 1, p126 

    Eating behaviors impact satiety and caloric intake so should be considered in any weight-loss program. A novel custom-made oral device has been designed to be worn in the upper palate while eating in order to slow eating-rate and aid weight loss. The aim of this study was to assess the device's...

  • Shifting the focus to health, not weight: First, do no harm. Cadenhead, Kathleen; Sweeny, Margo; Leslie, Barb; Yeung, Helen; Yandel, Margaret // British Columbia Medical Journal;Apr2012, Vol. 54 Issue 3, p144 

    The article emphasizes a need for physicians to encourage healthy eating and lifestyles instead of weight loss among overweight patients. It notes the potential negative impact of a weight-loss emphasis on both physical and mental well-being. The unintended consequences associated with...

  • Predicting short-term weight loss using four leading health behavior change theories. Palmeira, António L.; Teixeira, Pedro J.; Branco, Teresa L.; Martins, Sandra S.; Minderico, Cláudia S.; Barata, José T.; Serpa, Sidónio O.; Sardinha, Luís B. // International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition & Physical Activit;2007, Vol. 4, p14 

    Background: This study was conceived to analyze how exercise and weight management psychosocial variables, derived from several health behavior change theories, predict weight change in a short-term intervention. The theories under analysis were the Social Cognitive Theory, the Transtheoretical...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics