TITLE

Iron and exclusive breastfeeding

AUTHOR(S)
Tawai, Susan
PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Breastfeeding Review;2012, Vol. 20 Issue 1, p35
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the iron supplementation of breastfeeding babies. It mentions that iron is an important micronutrient for the socioemotional, neurophysiological, cognitive, and motor development of infants. It notes that a healthy infant exclusively breastfed for six months will have sufficient iron for at least six months when appropriate iron-rich complementary foods is introduced. INSET: Glossary.
ACCESSION #
76169667

 

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