TITLE

Effect of glimepiride and nateglinide on serum insulin and glucose concentration in healthy cats

AUTHOR(S)
Mori, A.; Lee, P.; Yamashita, T.; Nishimaki, Y.; Oda, H.; Saeki, K.; Miki, Y.; Mizutani, H.; Ishioka, K.; Honjo, T.; Arai, T.; Sako, T.
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Veterinary Research Communications;Dec2009, Vol. 33 Issue 8, p957
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Glimepiride and nateglinide are two common oral hypoglycemic agents currently being used with humans suffering from Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Neither drug has been tested with cats thus far and it is currently unknown whether either of these drugs exert any effect in cats or not. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of glimepiride and nateglinide on glucose and insulin responses in healthy control cats, in order to determine their potential use in diabetic cats. The intravenous glucose tolerance tests was carried out since it is an excellent test for evaluating pancreatic β-cell function for insulin secretion. Alterations in the insulin secretion pattern can be perceived as the earliest sign of β-cell dysfunction in many species, including cats. Nateglinide demonstrated a quick action/short duration type effect with serum glucose nadiring and insulin response peaking at 60 and 20 minutes, respectively. Alternatively, glimepiride is medium-to-long acting with serum glucose nadiring and insulin response peaking at 180 minutes and 60 minutes, respectively. Nateglinide's potency was evident allowing it to induce a 1.5-2 higher preliminary insulin peak (3.7 ± 1.1 pg/ml) than glimepiride's (2.5 ± 0.1 pg/ml), albeit only for a short period of time. Because glimepiride and nateglinide have a shared mode of action, no significant differences in overall glucose AUC (24,435 ± 2,940 versus 24,782 ± 2,354 mg min/dl) and insulin AUC (410 ± 192 versus 460 ± 159) in healthy control cats were observed. These findings may provide useful information when choosing a hypoglycemic drug suited for the treatment of diabetic cats depending on the degree of diabetes mellitus the cat is suffering from.
ACCESSION #
76611712

 

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