TITLE

We're Over-Challenging Students

AUTHOR(S)
Toepfer Jr., Conrad F.
PUB. DATE
October 1981
SOURCE
Educational Leadership;Oct81, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p56
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Argues that U.S. education curricula are unrealistic in terms of the actual thinking capacity of the majority of American students. Programming of built-in failure experiences through methods, curricula, instructional materials and expectations; Need for educational programs that emphasize the improved learning of facts and information by consolidating existing levels during plateau periods.
ACCESSION #
7734392

 

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