TITLE

West Virginia Unveils Energy Plan

AUTHOR(S)
Mazukiewicz, Greg
PUB. DATE
November 2002
SOURCE
Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News;11/4/2002, Vol. 217 Issue 10, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on West Virginia's energy plan. Continued use of coal and natural gas resources; Development of new energy and environmental technologies; Energy-efficiency measures; Renewable energy.
ACCESSION #
7743447

 

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