TITLE

Air pollution and emergency room visits for asthma in Santa Clara County, California

AUTHOR(S)
Hurley, Susan; Lipsett, Michael; Ostro, Bart
PUB. DATE
February 1997
SOURCE
Environmental Health Perspectives;Feb1997, Vol. 105 Issue 2, p216
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
During the winters of 1986-1987 through 1991-1992, rainfall throughout much of Northern California was subnormal, resulting in intermittent accumulation of air pollution, much of which was attributable to residential wood combustion (RWC). This investigation examined whetherthere was a relationship between ambient air pollution in Santa Clara County, California and emergency room visits for asthma during the winters of 1988-1989 through 1991-1992. Emergency room (ER) records from three acute-care hospitals were abstracted to compare daily visits for asthma and a control diagnosis (gastroenteritis) for 3-month periods during each winter. Air monitoring data included daily coefficient of haze (COH) and every-other day particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 10 microns (PM10 24-hr average), as well as hourly nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentrations. Daily COH measurements were used to predict values for missing days of PM10 to develop a complete PM10time series. Daily data were also obtained for temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. In time-series analyses using Poisson regression, consistent relationships were found between ER visits for asthma and PM10. Same-day nitrogen dioxide concentrations were also associated with asthma ER visits, while ozone was not. Because there was a significant interaction between PM10 and minimum temperature in this data set, estimates of relative risks (RRs) forPM10-associated asthma ER visits were temperature-dependent. A 60 mu g/m3 change in PM10 (2-day lag) corresponded to RRs of 1.43 (95% CI = 1.18-1.69) at 20 deg.F, representing the low end of the temperature distribution, 1.27 (95% CI 1.13-1.42) at 30 deg.F, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.03-1.19) at 4l deg.F, the mean of the observed minimum temperatures. ER visits for gastroenteritis were not significantly associated with any pollutant variable. Several
ACCESSION #
8100281

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics