TITLE

Characteristics of Students With High-Incidence Disabilities Broadly Defined

AUTHOR(S)
Gage, Nicholas A.; Lierheimer, Kristin S.; Goran, Lisa G.
PUB. DATE
December 2012
SOURCE
Journal of Disability Policy Studies;Dec2012, Vol. 23 Issue 3, p168
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Students with high-incidence disabilities are the most prevalent among children and youth with disabilities in U.S. schools. This group typically includes students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (E/BD), learning disabilities (LD), and mild intellectual disability (MID). However, students with other disabilities, including high-functioning autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and speech and language impairment are now being identified at higher rates and occupy an aggregate “other” category within high-incidence disabilities. Yet, little research has examined similarities between students identified in the traditional high-incidence group (emotional disorder, LD, MID) and students in the growing “other” category. This study was designed to examine similarities and differences between students with high-incidence disabilities broadly defined. Using an extant database, cognitive ability, academic performance, and behavioral performances were examined across disability categories. Findings indicate that, other than for students with E/BD on behavior, very few differences were evident. Policy implications are forwarded to facilitate discussion of inclusion and intervention practices for high-incidence disabilities broadly defined.
ACCESSION #
83329397

 

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