TITLE

PREVALENCE AND DETERMINANTS OF HYPERTENSION IN ABIA STATE NIGERIA: RESULTS FROM THE ABIA STATE NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS SURVEY

AUTHOR(S)
Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Madukwe, Okechukwu O.; Chukwuonye, Innocent I.; Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu U.; Ukegbu, Andrew U.; Akhimien, Moses O.; Onwubere, Basden J. C.; Okpechi, Ikechi G.
PUB. DATE
April 2013
SOURCE
Ethnicity & Disease;Spring2013, Vol. 23 Issue 2, p161
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective: Hypertension is the most common non-communicable disease and risk factor for heart failure, stroke, chronic kidney disease and ischemic heart disease in sub-Saharan Africa. Few population-based studies have been conducted recently in Nigeria and, in Abia State, no previous study has been conducted on the prevalence and correlates of hypertension among the populace. The purpose of our study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and determinants of high blood pressure in Abia State, south- eastern Nigeria. We hypothesise that high blood pressure burden is high in Abia State. Design: The study was a community based cross-sectional house-to-house survey aimed at ascertaining the burden/prevalence of hyper- tension in the state as well as identifying related risk factors associated with them. Setting: The study was conducted in rural and urban communities in Abia State, Nigeria. Participants: Participants in the study were men and women aged ≤15 years and were recruited from the three senatorial zones in the state. Main Outcomes: A total of 2,999 respondents were selected for the survey and, 2,983 consented to be interviewed giving a response rate of 99.5%. The data for 2,928 participants were suitable for analysis. Of these, 1,399 (47.8%) were men. The mean age of the population was 41.7 ± 18.5 years (range 18- 96 years). About 54% of the population were ≤40 years. Ninety percent had at least primary education with about 47% having completed secondary education. Expectedly, 96% of the respondents were Ibos, the predominant tribe in the southeastern part of the country. Women had significantly higher BMI than the men. Similarly, waist circumference was also larger in women but waist-to-hip ratio was only significantly higher in women in the urban areas compared to those in rural areas. Thirty- one percent of all participants had systolic hypertension (33.5% in men and 30.5% in women). This sex difference was statistically different in the urban area. On the other hand, diastolic hypertension was 22.5% in all the population (23.4% in men and 25.4% in women). Age and indices of obesity were the strongest predictors of blood pressure. Conclusion: The prevalence of hypertension was high in our study both in rural and urban settings. The major determinants of blood pressure in our participants included age, sex, indices of obesity and pulse rate.
ACCESSION #
86252293

 

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