TITLE

Inspectionitis

AUTHOR(S)
Buckley Jr., William F.
PUB. DATE
December 2002
SOURCE
National Review;12/23/2002, Vol. 54 Issue 24, p59
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents implications of the investigation conducted by weapons inspectors of the United Nations (UN) about the possibility of a nuclear arms program in Iraq. There are 17 inspectors on the ground, and the team was specifically allowed to go wherever they chose. The administration is almost sure that Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein possesses the weapons of mass destruction. The administration has persuaded the Congress and the American people to invade Iraq and immobilize the regime of Hussein.
ACCESSION #
8637778

 

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