TITLE

Effect of the food restriction diets on zinc concentration in the tissues of female Wistar rats (animal anorexia model)

AUTHOR(S)
Wojciak, Rafal W.
PUB. DATE
June 2013
SOURCE
Trace Elements & Electrolytes;2013 2nd Quarter, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p41
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Aim: Although it is clear that zinc deficiency produces a specific and profound anorexia in experimental animals, the influence of food restriction on zinc management is less certain. The purpose of the present study was to assess the concentration of zinc in serum, erythrocytes, liver, kidney, brain, and femoral bone in food restricted female Wistar rats. Material and methods: The 48 rats (8-weeks old, 199 ± 18 g) were divided into 6 groups (n = 8): the control (K) - fed ad libitum, with measurements of daily intake, as a baseline for the amount of intake calculation to other groups; and five testing groups: the K72 - was getting a half portion of diet eaten by K. The rest of groups were fed with a 100% of the diet eaten by K, but in a different model of food restriction: GI -IV - 1 to 4 days on 1 to 4 days starvation, by 8 weeks of experiment. The zinc concentration, after wet mineralization, was measured by the AAS method. Results: The influence of the study model on the zinc concentration was clearly demonstrated in the serum, brain, liver and kidney (p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, and p < 0.001, respectively). Generally, there were lower levels of zinc in all of the analyzed soft tissues of the food restricted rats compared to the control, although the kidney zinc level was lower in K/2 than in K, but in other groups were raised with the number of starving days, thus in the GIV was the highest. Conclusions: The study shows that the food restriction can disturb the zinc management in the organisms of female rats, usually in the deficiency direction. Although in some tissues, the acute starvation does not change the zinc concentration (for example in the brain and kidney) even long term.
ACCESSION #
87314852

 

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