TITLE

2013: the year for change in the USA?

AUTHOR(S)
Ginsberg, Noah
PUB. DATE
March 2013
SOURCE
EcoGeneration;Mar/Apr2013, Issue 75, p66
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses various aspects related to the changes in the clean energy industry in the U.S. in 2013. It mentions that the Solar Energy Industries Association estimates increase growth of solar power in 2012. It further highlights various sectors which have achieved success in 2012 including wind, biofuels and geothermal. It further mentions the role of Production Tax Credit (PTC) in growth of the renewable energy sources.
ACCESSION #
87749807

 

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