TITLE

A cross-sectional survey of the opinions on weight loss treatments of adult obese patients attending a dietetic clinic

AUTHOR(S)
Thompson, R L; Thomas, D E
PUB. DATE
February 2000
SOURCE
International Journal of Obesity & Related Metabolic Disorders;Feb2000, Vol. 24 Issue 2, p164
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the views and opinions on weight loss treatments of adult obese patients attending a dietetic clinic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SUBJECTS: 161 adults attending dietetic outpatients clinics in Portsmouth for obesity with a body mass index of at least 30 kg/m². MEASUREMENTS: Self-administered questionnaire developed from a series of focus groups with obese adults. Key topics were previous attempts to lose weight, methods used, the role of physical activity and patients' views about treatment from health professionals. RESULTS: The preferences and usefulness of different methods to lose weight varied according to the number of attempts to lose weight, gender, age, body mass index and medical condition of the patient. Men were less likely to use special slimming products, attend slimming groups and swimming than women (odds ratios (95% confidence interval), 0.1 (0.03-0.6) for slimming groups other than Weight Watchers, 0.3 (0.1-0.80) for special slimming products and 0.3 (0.1-0.6) for swimming). Men were more likely to use physical activity (2.6 (1.1-6.2)) and in particular walking (3.7 (1.0-13.6)) and cycling (2.8 (1.0-7.6)) and were more likely to see the dietitian (3.8 (1.4-9.9)) than women. Those with more than 10 attempts to lose weight were more likely to see the dietitian (3.6(1.6-8.2)), use Weight Watchers (2.5 (1.1-5.6)) and newspapers and magazines (4.4 (1.8-10.9)) than those with fewer attempts. The younger age group were more likely to use more vigorous forms of exercise (4.2 (1.6-11.2) for keep fit and 3.7 (1.5-9.6) for cycling) than the older subjects. The most obese were more likely to have negative views on their treatment by health professionals (4.4 (1.9-9.8) 'chairs are never big enough' and 4.0 (1.8-8.8) 'I am regarded as a second class citizen') than those who were less obese. Those without a medical condition were more likely to exercise (2.8 (1.3-6.3)) and use books (4.8 (2.0-11.2)) than those with a...
ACCESSION #
8853251

 

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