TITLE

Practical Intelligence for Success in School

AUTHOR(S)
Sternberg, Robert J.; Okagaki, Lynn; Jackson, Alice S.
PUB. DATE
September 1990
SOURCE
Educational Leadership;Sep90, Vol. 48 Issue 1, p35
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article details the development of the Yale Practical Intelligence-for-School curriculum. Since 1987, a Yale University team of investigators and Howard Gardner's Harvard University researchers have engaged in a joint effort to develop the theory-based curriculum, practical intelligence for school. The program is an outgrowth of a merger between two theories of a merger between two theories of human intelligence: Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences and Robert J. Sternberg's triarchic theory of human intelligence. The research teams came up with a total Practical Intelligence curriculum which includes two parts: the Yale portion of the curriculum, designed to teach skills used across content areas and the Harvard portion of the curriculum which emphasized individual subject-matter infusion of skills within the content class. The curriculum is based upon the three kinds of tacit knowledge that Wagner and Sternberg have found critical to adaptation to any environment: managing oneself, managing tasks and working with others. The course opens with instruction on how students can manage themselves. The second part of the course, managing tasks, deals with topics such as getting organized, setting up strategies for problem solving, breaking bad habits, seeking help with problems and thinking about time management. The third part of the course, cooperating with others, presents such topics as how to handle yourself in class discussions, knowing what to say when putting yourself in other's place and solving communication problems.
ACCESSION #
9107151402

 

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