TITLE

Where's The Red Line?

AUTHOR(S)
Wehrfritz, George; Takayama, Hideko; Lee, B.J.
PUB. DATE
February 2003
SOURCE
Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);2/17/2003 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 7, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
North Korea delivered another dose of bluster in February 2003 through an unlikely conduit: British journalists. In Washington D.C., meanwhile, the Pentagon put 24 long-range bombers on alert for possible dispatch to the region and signaled that the departures of some 2,900 troops scheduled to complete tours in South Korea might be delayed to keep United States' combat presence at full strength. Washington D.C., Tokyo and South Korea agree on one thing: North Korea's bluster cannot be taken at face value. Unlike in 1994, when North Korea's efforts to covertly develop a nuclear arsenal were the focus, today's crisis encompasses two discrete nuclear programs, plutonium- and uranium-based, as well as ballistic missiles, chemical and biological weapons and South Korea's ongoing diplomatic campaign to forge better North-South ties. At a conference in Washington, D.C. Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz raised an idea that might ease Chinese fears: treating North Korean refugees like Vietnamese boat people by providing countries of first asylum--principally China and Russia--with assurances that the refugees would be transferred to other locations for final resettlement.
ACCESSION #
9122023

 

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