TITLE

Plants that protect ecosystems: a survey from California

AUTHOR(S)
Pavlik, Bruce M.
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
Biodiversity & Conservation;Apr2003, Vol. 12 Issue 4, p717
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on state and federal endangered species laws that allow the protection of critical habitat for listed plant taxa. How in the case of extreme ecological specialists with restricted geographic distributions, significant proportions of unusual ecosystems could thus be afforded protection as a byproduct of listing and subsequent restrictions on land use or management practices; Study surveying federally and state-listed plants to determine (1) which taxa conserved a significant proportion of a distinctive ecosystem, (2) which taxa provided a protective, regulatory `umbrella? to unlisted rare or restricted plants and animals, and (3) the taxonomic, life history or other characteristics correlated with the greatest secondary benefits; Results indicating taxonomic distinctiveness and non-biological factors generated the greatest secondary effects; View that management and monitoring problems prevent the assessment of whether such single-species approaches can effectively conserve ecosystems.
ACCESSION #
9155350

 

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