TITLE

Infertility, Pregnancy Loss and Adverse Birth Outcomes in Relation to Maternal Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure

AUTHOR(S)
Meeker, John D.; Benedict, Merle D.
PUB. DATE
February 2013
SOURCE
Current Women's Health Reviews;Feb2013, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p41
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A substantial proportion of the etiology involved in female infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes remainsidiopathic. Recent scientific research has suggested a role for environmental factors in these conditions. Secondhandtobacco smoke (STS) contains a number of known or suspected reproductive toxins, and human exposure to STS isprevalent worldwide. Robust evidence exists for the toxic effects of active smoking on fertility and pregnancy, but studiesof passive exposure are much more limited in number. While the association between maternal STS exposure anddeclined birth weight has been fairly well-documented, only recently have epidemiologic studies begun to providesuggestive evidence for delayed conception, altered menstrual cycling, early pregnancy loss (e.g. spontaneous abortion),preterm delivery, and congenital malformations in relation to STS exposure. There is also new evidence thatdevelopmental exposures to tobacco smoke may be associated with reproductive effects in adulthood. To date, moststudies have estimated maternal STS exposure through self-report even though exposure biomarkers are less prone toerror and recall bias. In addition to utilizing biomarkers of STS exposure, future studies should aim to identify vitalwindows of STS exposure, important environmental co-exposures, individual susceptibility factors, and specific STSconstituents associated with female infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The role of paternal exposures/factorsshould also be investigated.
ACCESSION #
92631214

 

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