TITLE

Soil respiration, NO, and CH emissions from an Andisol under conventional-tillage and no-tillage cultivation for 4 years

AUTHOR(S)
Yonemura, Seiichiro; Nouchi, Isamu; Nishimura, Seiichi; Sakurai, Gen; Togami, Kazuki; Yagi, Kazuyuki
PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
Biology & Fertility of Soils;Jan2014, Vol. 50 Issue 1, p63
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No-tillage (NT) management is a promising method to sequester soil C and mitigate global warming caused by agricultural activities. Here, we report 4 years of continuous soil respiration rates and weekly nitrous oxide (NO) and methane (CH) emissions in NT and conventional-tillage (CT) plots in a typical Japanese volcanic soil. Overall, the soil respiration, NO emission, and CH uptake decreased significantly in the NT plot. A difference in soil respiration and NO emission between the two plots began after the tillage treatment and the incorporation of crop residues and fertilizers, whereas the CH uptake did not vary significantly during the fallow period after the treatments. The NO emission was higher from the CT than from the NT plot during the fall. The overall lower CH uptake in the NT than in the CT plot likely resulted from a combination of decreased soil gas diffusivity and higher mineral N content at the soil surface. Higher soil respiration and NO emission occurred in the NT plot in the summer of 2003 and were plausibly caused by an increase in the soil moisture content that resulted from lower temperatures during July and August; the higher soil moisture must have accelerated the decomposition of organic matter accumulated in the topsoil. These results indicate that NT management is generally effective for the mitigation of the total GWP by reducing soil respiration and NO emission in temperate regions; however, NT management may increase rather than decrease these emissions when fields experience cool summers with frequent rainfall.
ACCESSION #
93392338

 

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