TITLE

NEXT OF KIM

AUTHOR(S)
Solarz, Stephen J.
PUB. DATE
August 1994
SOURCE
New Republic;8/8/94, Vol. 211 Issue 6, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines the threat posed by the nuclear weapons program in North Korea as of 1994. Possible consequences of the nuclear weapons program; Efforts of the U.S. to persuade North Korea to abandon the nuclear weapons program; Benefits of establishing diplomatic relations with North Korea; Countries concerned about the possible use of nuclear weapons against them.
ACCESSION #
9408057623

 

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